دورات هندسية

 

 

Kanban. Do you hear o it?

النتائج 1 إلى 5 من 5
  1. [1]
    aitsaid_10
    aitsaid_10 غير متواجد حالياً

    عضو

    تاريخ التسجيل: Jan 2009
    المشاركات: 27
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0

    Kanban. Do you hear o it?

    hello engineers. i am looking or an e-book or KAnban system. do you can help or that?
    salut les amis, je suis en recherche d'un e-book pour l'implontation d'un systeme de Kanban pour un etelier ameublement.

    hallo freunden. Ich suche ur en e-book or kanban. Konnes sie mir helfen?

  2. [2]
    محمد فوزى
    محمد فوزى غير متواجد حالياً
    عضو شرف
    الصورة الرمزية محمد فوزى


    تاريخ التسجيل: Jun 2005
    المشاركات: 243

    وسام الشكر

     وسام كبار الشخصيات

    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0
    Jump to: navigation, search
    The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article or discuss the issue on the talk page.
    This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references (ideally, using inline citations). Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2008)
    This article contains instructions, advice, or how-to *******. The purpose of Wikipedia is to present facts, not to train. Please help improve this article either by rewriting the how-to ******* or by moving it to Wikiversity or Wikibooks.


    Kanban (in kanji 看板 also in katakana カンバン, where kan, 看 / カン, means "visual," and ban, 板 / バン, means "card" or "board") is a concept related to lean and just-in-time (JIT) production. The Japanese word kanban (pronounced [kambaɴ]) is a common everyday term meaning "signboard" or "billboard" and utterly lacks the specialized meaning that this loanword has acquired in English. According to Taiichi Ohno, the man credited with developing JIT, kanban is a means through which JIT is achieved.[1]

    Kanban is a signaling system to trigger action. As its name suggests, kanban historically uses cards to signal the need for an item. However, other devices such as plastic markers (kanban squares) or balls (often golf balls) or an empty part-transport trolley or floor location can also be used to trigger the movement, production, or supply of a unit in a factory.

    It was out of a need to maintain the level of improvements that the kanban system was devised by Toyota. Kanban became an effective tool to support the running of the production system as a whole. In addition, it proved to be an excellent way for promoting improvements because reducing the number of kanban in circulation highlighted problem areas.[2]

    *******s [hide]
    1 Origins
    2 Operation
    3 E-kanban systems
    4 See also
    5 References
    6 Further reading



    [edit] Origins
    The term kanban describes an embellished wooden or metal sign which has often been reduced to become a trade mark or seal. Since the 17th century, this expression in the Japanese mercantile system has been as important to the merchants of Japan as military banners have been to the samurai. Visual puns, calligraphy and ingenious shapes — or kanban — define the trade and class of a business or tradesman. Often produced within rigid Confucian restrictions on size and color, the signs and seals are masterpieces of logo and symbol design. For example, sumo wrestlers, a symbol of strength, may be used as kanban on a pharmacy's sign to advertise a treatment for anemia.

    In the late 1940s, Toyota was studying supermarkets with a view to applying some of their management techniques to their work. This interest came about because in a supermarket the customer can get what is needed at the time needed in the amount needed. The supermarket only stocks what it believes it will sell and the customer only takes what they need because future supply is assured. This led Toyota to view earlier processes, to that in focus, as a kind of store. The process goes to this store to get its needed components and the store then replenishes those components. It is the rate of this replenishment, which is controlled by kanban that gives the permission to produce. In 1953, Toyota applied this logic in their main plant machine shop.[3]


    [edit] Operation
    An important determinant of the success of "push" production scheduling is the quality of the demand forecast which provides the "push". Kanban, by contrast, is part of a pull system that determines the supply, or production, according to the actual demand of the customers. In contexts where supply time is lengthy and demand is difficult to forecast, the best one can do is to respond quickly to observed demand. This is exactly what a kanban system can help: it is used as a demand signal which immediately propagates through the supply chain. This can be used to ensure that intermediate stocks held in the supply chain are better managed, usually smaller. Where the supply response cannot be quick enough to meet actual demand fluctuations, causing significant lost sales, then stock building may be deemed as appropriate which can be achieved by issuing more kanban. Taiichi Ohno states that in order to be effective kanban must follow strict rules of use[4] (Toyota, for example, has six simple rules) and that close monitoring of these rules is a never-ending problem to ensure that kanban does what is required.

    A simple example of the kanban system implementation might be a "three-bin system" for the supplied parts (where there is no in-house manufacturing) — one bin on the factory floor, one bin in the factory store and one bin at the suppliers' store. The bins usually have a removable card that contains the product details and other relevant information — the kanban card. When the bin on the factory floor is empty, the bin and kanban card are returned to the factory store. The factory store then replaces the bin on the factory floor with a full bin, which also contains a kanban card. The factory store then contacts the supplier’s store and returns the now empty bin with its kanban card. The supplier's inbound product bin with its kanban card is then delivered into the factory store completing the final step to the system. Thus the process will never run out of product and could be described as a loop, providing the exact amount required, with only one spare so there will never be an issue of over-supply. This 'spare' bin allows for the uncertainty in supply, use and transport that are inherent in the system. The secret to a good kanban system is to calculate how many kanban cards are required for each product. Most factories using kanban use the coloured board system (Heijunka Box). This consists of a board created especially for holding the kanban cards.


    [edit] E-kanban systems
    Many manufacturers have implemented electronic kanban systems.[5] Electronic kanban systems, or E-Kanban systems, help to eliminate common problems such as manual entry errors and lost cards. [6] E-Kanban systems can be integrated into enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Integrating E-Kanban systems into ERP systems allows for real-time demand signaling across the supply chain and improved visibility. Data pulled from E-Kanban systems can be used to optimize inventory levels by better tracking supplier lead and replenishment times. [7]


    [edit] See also
    CONWIP
    C-VARWIP
    Enterprise resource planning (ERP)
    Just In Time (JIT)
    Manufacturing
    Material requirements planning (MRP)
    Manufacturing resource planning (MRP II)
    Scheduling (production processes)
    Supply chain management
    Drum-Buffer-Rope

    [edit] References
    ^ Ohno, Taiichi (June 1988). Toyota Production System - beyond large-scale production. Productivity Press. pp. 29. ISBN 0915299143.
    ^ Shingō, Shigeo (1989). A Study of the Toyota Production System from an Industrial Engineering Viewpoint. Productivity Press. pp. 228. ISBN 0915299178.
    ^ Ohno, Taiichi (June 1988). Toyota Production System - beyond large-scale production. Productivity Press. pp. 25–28. ISBN 0915299143.
    ^ Shingō, Shigeo (1989). A Study of the Toyota Production System from an Industrial Engineering Viewpoint. Productivity Press. pp. 30. ISBN 0915299178.
    ^ Vernyi, B., & Vinas, T. (December 1, 2005). Easing into E-Kanban. Retrieved April 12, 2008, from IndustryWeek: http://www.industryweek.com/ReadArti...rticleID=11009
    ^ Drickhamer, David. (March, 2005). The Kanban E-volution. Material Handling Management , pp. 24-26.
    ^ Cutler, Thomas Examining Lean Manufacturing Promise. Retrieved April 12, 2008, from SoftwareMag.com: http://www.king-*******.com/l.cfm?doc=967-8/2006

    [edit] Further reading
    Ohno, Taiichi (February, 1988). Toyota Production System: Beyond Large-Scale Production. Productivity Press. ISBN 978-0-915299-14-0. http://www.productivitypress.com/pro...ils.cfm?PC=109.
    Waldner, Jean-Baptiste (September, 1992). Principles of Computer-Integrated Manufacturing. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 047193450X.
    Louis, Raymond (2006). Custom Kanban: Designing the System to Meet the Needs of Your Environment. University Park, IL: Productivity Press. ISBN 978-1-56327-345-2. http://www.productivitypress.com/pro...ils.cfm?PC=375.
    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanban"
    Categories: Business terms | Manufacturing | Japanese business terms | Quality control | Production and manufacturing | Lean concepts
    Hidden categories: Articles with limited geographic scope | Articles needing additional references from August 2008 | Articles containing how-to sections
    ViewsArticle Discussion Edit this page History Personal toolsLog in / create account Navigation
    Main page
    *******s
    Featured *******
    Current events
    Random article
    Search
    Interaction
    About Wikipedia
    Community portal
    Recent changes
    Contact Wikipedia
    Donate to Wikipedia
    Help
    Toolbox
    What links here
    Related changes
    Upload file
    Special pages
    Printable version
    Permanent link
    Cite this page
    Languages
    Deutsch
    Español
    Français
    Italiano
    עברית
    Magyar
    Nederlands
    日本語
    ‪Norsk (bokmål)‬
    Polski
    Português
    Svenska
    Türkçe
    中文

    This page was last modified on 31 March 2009, at 04:45 (UTC). All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. (See Copyrights for details.)
    Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a U.S. registered 501(c)(3) tax-deductible nonprofit charity

    0 Not allowed!



  3. [3]
    محمد فوزى
    محمد فوزى غير متواجد حالياً
    عضو شرف
    الصورة الرمزية محمد فوزى


    تاريخ التسجيل: Jun 2005
    المشاركات: 243

    وسام الشكر

     وسام كبار الشخصيات

    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0
    Jump to: navigation, search
    The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article or discuss the issue on the talk page.
    This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references (ideally, using inline citations). Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2008)
    This article contains instructions, advice, or how-to *******. The purpose of Wikipedia is to present facts, not to train. Please help improve this article either by rewriting the how-to ******* or by moving it to Wikiversity or Wikibooks.


    Kanban (in kanji 看板 also in katakana カンバン, where kan, 看 / カン, means "visual," and ban, 板 / バン, means "card" or "board") is a concept related to lean and just-in-time (JIT) production. The Japanese word kanban (pronounced [kambaɴ]) is a common everyday term meaning "signboard" or "billboard" and utterly lacks the specialized meaning that this loanword has acquired in English. According to Taiichi Ohno, the man credited with developing JIT, kanban is a means through which JIT is achieved.[1]

    Kanban is a signaling system to trigger action. As its name suggests, kanban historically uses cards to signal the need for an item. However, other devices such as plastic markers (kanban squares) or balls (often golf balls) or an empty part-transport trolley or floor location can also be used to trigger the movement, production, or supply of a unit in a factory.

    It was out of a need to maintain the level of improvements that the kanban system was devised by Toyota. Kanban became an effective tool to support the running of the production system as a whole. In addition, it proved to be an excellent way for promoting improvements because reducing the number of kanban in circulation highlighted problem areas.[2]

    *******s [hide]
    1 Origins
    2 Operation
    3 E-kanban systems
    4 See also
    5 References
    6 Further reading



    [edit] Origins
    The term kanban describes an embellished wooden or metal sign which has often been reduced to become a trade mark or seal. Since the 17th century, this expression in the Japanese mercantile system has been as important to the merchants of Japan as military banners have been to the samurai. Visual puns, calligraphy and ingenious shapes — or kanban — define the trade and class of a business or tradesman. Often produced within rigid Confucian restrictions on size and color, the signs and seals are masterpieces of logo and symbol design. For example, sumo wrestlers, a symbol of strength, may be used as kanban on a pharmacy's sign to advertise a treatment for anemia.

    In the late 1940s, Toyota was studying supermarkets with a view to applying some of their management techniques to their work. This interest came about because in a supermarket the customer can get what is needed at the time needed in the amount needed. The supermarket only stocks what it believes it will sell and the customer only takes what they need because future supply is assured. This led Toyota to view earlier processes, to that in focus, as a kind of store. The process goes to this store to get its needed components and the store then replenishes those components. It is the rate of this replenishment, which is controlled by kanban that gives the permission to produce. In 1953, Toyota applied this logic in their main plant machine shop.[3]


    [edit] Operation
    An important determinant of the success of "push" production scheduling is the quality of the demand forecast which provides the "push". Kanban, by contrast, is part of a pull system that determines the supply, or production, according to the actual demand of the customers. In contexts where supply time is lengthy and demand is difficult to forecast, the best one can do is to respond quickly to observed demand. This is exactly what a kanban system can help: it is used as a demand signal which immediately propagates through the supply chain. This can be used to ensure that intermediate stocks held in the supply chain are better managed, usually smaller. Where the supply response cannot be quick enough to meet actual demand fluctuations, causing significant lost sales, then stock building may be deemed as appropriate which can be achieved by issuing more kanban. Taiichi Ohno states that in order to be effective kanban must follow strict rules of use[4] (Toyota, for example, has six simple rules) and that close monitoring of these rules is a never-ending problem to ensure that kanban does what is required.

    A simple example of the kanban system implementation might be a "three-bin system" for the supplied parts (where there is no in-house manufacturing) — one bin on the factory floor, one bin in the factory store and one bin at the suppliers' store. The bins usually have a removable card that contains the product details and other relevant information — the kanban card. When the bin on the factory floor is empty, the bin and kanban card are returned to the factory store. The factory store then replaces the bin on the factory floor with a full bin, which also contains a kanban card. The factory store then contacts the supplier’s store and returns the now empty bin with its kanban card. The supplier's inbound product bin with its kanban card is then delivered into the factory store completing the final step to the system. Thus the process will never run out of product and could be described as a loop, providing the exact amount required, with only one spare so there will never be an issue of over-supply. This 'spare' bin allows for the uncertainty in supply, use and transport that are inherent in the system. The secret to a good kanban system is to calculate how many kanban cards are required for each product. Most factories using kanban use the coloured board system (Heijunka Box). This consists of a board created especially for holding the kanban cards.


    [edit] E-kanban systems
    Many manufacturers have implemented electronic kanban systems.[5] Electronic kanban systems, or E-Kanban systems, help to eliminate common problems such as manual entry errors and lost cards. [6] E-Kanban systems can be integrated into enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Integrating E-Kanban systems into ERP systems allows for real-time demand signaling across the supply chain and improved visibility. Data pulled from E-Kanban systems can be used to optimize inventory levels by better tracking supplier lead and replenishment times. [7]


    [edit] See also
    CONWIP
    C-VARWIP
    Enterprise resource planning (ERP)
    Just In Time (JIT)
    Manufacturing
    Material requirements planning (MRP)
    Manufacturing resource planning (MRP II)
    Scheduling (production processes)
    Supply chain management
    Drum-Buffer-Rope

    [edit] References
    ^ Ohno, Taiichi (June 1988). Toyota Production System - beyond large-scale production. Productivity Press. pp. 29. ISBN 0915299143.
    ^ Shingō, Shigeo (1989). A Study of the Toyota Production System from an Industrial Engineering Viewpoint. Productivity Press. pp. 228. ISBN 0915299178.
    ^ Ohno, Taiichi (June 1988). Toyota Production System - beyond large-scale production. Productivity Press. pp. 25–28. ISBN 0915299143.
    ^ Shingō, Shigeo (1989). A Study of the Toyota Production System from an Industrial Engineering Viewpoint. Productivity Press. pp. 30. ISBN 0915299178.
    ^ Vernyi, B., & Vinas, T. (December 1, 2005). Easing into E-Kanban. Retrieved April 12, 2008, from IndustryWeek: http://www.industryweek.com/ReadArti...rticleID=11009
    ^ Drickhamer, David. (March, 2005). The Kanban E-volution. Material Handling Management , pp. 24-26.
    ^ Cutler, Thomas Examining Lean Manufacturing Promise. Retrieved April 12, 2008, from SoftwareMag.com: http://www.king-*******.com/l.cfm?doc=967-8/2006

    [edit] Further reading
    Ohno, Taiichi (February, 1988). Toyota Production System: Beyond Large-Scale Production. Productivity Press. ISBN 978-0-915299-14-0. http://www.productivitypress.com/pro...ils.cfm?PC=109.
    Waldner, Jean-Baptiste (September, 1992). Principles of Computer-Integrated Manufacturing. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 047193450X.
    Louis, Raymond (2006). Custom Kanban: Designing the System to Meet the Needs of Your Environment. University Park, IL: Productivity Press. ISBN 978-1-56327-345-2. http://www.productivitypress.com/pro...ils.cfm?PC=375.
    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanban"
    Categories: Business terms | Manufacturing | Japanese business terms | Quality control | Production and manufacturing | Lean concepts
    Hidden categories: Articles with limited geographic scope | Articles needing additional references from August 2008 | Articles containing how-to sections
    ViewsArticle Discussion Edit this page History Personal toolsLog in / create account Navigation
    Main page
    *******s
    Featured *******
    Current events
    Random article
    Search
    Interaction
    About Wikipedia
    Community portal
    Recent changes
    Contact Wikipedia
    Donate to Wikipedia
    Help
    Toolbox
    What links here
    Related changes
    Upload file
    Special pages
    Printable version
    Permanent link
    Cite this page
    Languages
    Deutsch
    Español
    Français
    Italiano
    עברית
    Magyar
    Nederlands
    日本語
    ‪Norsk (bokmål)‬
    Polski
    Português
    Svenska
    Türkçe
    中文

    This page was last modified on 31 March 2009, at 04:45 (UTC). All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. (See Copyrights for details.)
    Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a U.S. registered 501(c)(3) tax-deductible nonprofit charity

    0 Not allowed!



  4. [4]
    المهندس ابو نهار
    المهندس ابو نهار غير متواجد حالياً
    عضو


    تاريخ التسجيل: Apr 2008
    المشاركات: 11
    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0
    بالعربي يا شباب الله يرضى عليكم

    لو نبغى المعلومة بالانقليزي ممكن نجيبها بالعم قوقل

    و منتدانا منتدى عربي :(

    0 Not allowed!



  5. [5]
    محمد فوزى
    محمد فوزى غير متواجد حالياً
    عضو شرف
    الصورة الرمزية محمد فوزى


    تاريخ التسجيل: Jun 2005
    المشاركات: 243

    وسام الشكر

     وسام كبار الشخصيات

    Thumbs Up
    Received: 0
    Given: 0
    الاخ المهندس ابو نهار
    يجب ان يكون المهندس قادرا على التعامل مع اللغة الانجليزية وخصوصا ادا كانت المراجع فى الموضوع كلها انجليزية ونحن نجتهد اولا فى البحث عن مصدر عربى للمعلومة فادا لم نجد نكتب الانجليزى
    بخصوص نظام كانبان فهو باختصار نظام التعامل السريع مع احتياجات التوريد او اوامر الانتاج ويفيد فى الاتى
    سرعة تلبية احتياجات العميل
    عدم تكدس بضائع غير لازمة بالمخازن
    انتاج ما يحتاج اليه العميل طبقا لاولويات طلبات الشراء
    وعمليا يعتمد النظام على صدور اشارة بنقص السلعة فور سحبها من مكان تخزينها اى ادارة التوريد لاصدار اوامر الاستعواض من المخزن ومن المصنع المنتج للسلعة

    0 Not allowed!



  
الكلمات الدلالية لهذا الموضوع

عرض سحابة الكلمة الدلالية

RSS RSS 2.0 XML MAP HTML